Steering Comittee

Tom Toremans (Director)

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Tom Toremans is assistant professor at KU Leuven, where he teaches English, Scottish and European literature, and literary theory. His research interests include British Romanticism, Scottish literature, periodical studies, and translation and reception studies. He is a member of the steering committee of the Centre for Translation Studies (CETRA) and of the executive board of the Reception Studies Society. He is also a member of the editorial board of the journal Reception: Texts, Readers, Audiences, History. More details on publications and current research projects under his supervision can be found on his personal website.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: tom.toremans@kuleuven.be

Jack McMartin (Vice-Director)

Jack McMartin

Jack McMartin is a postdoctoral researcher on the CERES-co-led project ‘Challenging the European Monoculture – Towards a Policy on the Diversification of the European Literary Field’, which studies literary transfer between small European literatures using Flanders and Hungary as a pilot case. His doctoral dissertation, Boek to Book (supervisor: Elke Brems, co-supervisor: Reine Meylaerts, defended June 2019), investigated the production, circulation and reception contexts of Dutch literature in translation published between 1998 and 2018 in order to give insight into the contemporary world market for book translations and the institutions, people, editorial strategies and circulation mechanisms that shape it. He is co-editor (with Jan Van Coillie) of Children’s Literature in Translation: Texts and Contexts (Leuven University Press, forthcoming). He is also developing a project on the life and work of the well-known translation studies scholar James S Holmes.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: jack.mcmartin@kuleuven.be
Publications

Elke Brems

Elke Brems

Elke Brems is associate professor (‘hoofddocent’) at the Faculty of Arts KU Leuven. She is the head of the Research Unit of Translation Studies at KU Leuven. Her research interests include Dutch literature, Reception Studies and Translation Studies. She has published on contemporary Dutch poetry, literature and poetics during the interwar period, the relation between Dutch culture and other cultures, cultural identity and literature. She is a member of the Board of CETRA (Centre for Translation Studies). She is also a member of the editorial boards of Zacht Lawijd and of Poeziekrant.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: elke.brems@kuleuven.be

Jan Ceuppens

Jan Ceuppens

Jan Ceuppens (°1964) is German lecturer at the department of applied linguistics at KU Leuven, where he teaches literature, translation, and interpreting. His research interests include modern and contemporary German literature, translation and reception studies. He has published on W.G. Sebald (Vorbildhafte Trauer. W.G. Sebalds Die Ausgewanderten und die Rhetorik der Restitution (Eggegingen: Isele 2010)) as well as articles on Kafka and on the interaction between Flemish and German literature in the 19th and early 20th century, notably the translations of Hendrik Conscience’s De Leeuw van Vlaanderen.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: j.ceuppens@kuleuven.be

Theresia Feldmann

Theresia Feldmann

Theresia Feldmann studied German, French and English literature at the universities of Brussels (VUB) and Nantes. Before joining the CERES team she worked for an international law firm in the European Quarter and the Goethe-Institut in Brussels. She is currently working on a Ph.D under the supervision of Elke Brems, as part of the project “Eastbound: the circulation and reception of translations and adaptations of Dutch-language literature, 1850-1990”. This joint project of KU Leuven and Huygens ING forms part of the overarching initiative Circulation of Dutch Literature (CODL). The focus of her research is on the international cultural and economic networks which brought Dutch-language literature to the German-language area.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: theresia.feldmann@kuleuven.be

Doctoral Researchers

Rosanne Ceuppens

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Rosanne Ceuppens has graduated with a Master’s degree of Literature and Linguistics (Dutch, English) in 2014 and Master of German Literature in 2015 at the VUB and Heinrich-Heine-Universität in Düsseldorf. After having completed a teacher training in linguistics and literary studies, she worked as a teacher at ILT KU Leuven before joining the CERES team. Rosanne is currently working on a Ph.D project on the reception of Heinrich Böll’s novels during the 20th century in the Netherlands and Flanders. Her research entails a textual analysis of Dutch translations and comes to terms with how these translations are received in the target culture. Focusing on the socio-cultural and textual identity of Böll’s translations will not only provide insight into the Flemish and Dutch society but will also shed light on the literary expression of Böll’s works beyond national and spatial boundaries. This project is supervised by Jan Ceuppens and Elke Brems.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: rosanne.ceuppens@kuleuven.be

Ernest De Clerck

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Ernest De Clerck (1993) is working on a Ph.D project on ‘The Reception and Translation of Foreign Cultures in British Romantic Literary Magazines, 1817-1830)’. More specifically, he is concerned with the political dynamics governing editorial practices. What do reception and translation policies of magazines such as Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine and The London Magazine tell us about their ideology? The project is supervised by Tom Toremans (KU Leuven) and Frederik Van Dam (Radboud University).
De Clerck graduated as Master in Western Literature in 2015 and as Master in Literary Theories in 2016. He worked at the KU Leuven Culture Office for a year and a half before joining the CERES team as a doctoral researcher.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: ernest.declerck@kuleuven.be

Melanie Hacke

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Melanie Hacke graduated as Master of Western Literature (English and Latin) at the University of Leuven in 2015, and as Master in Victorian Studies at the University of Exeter in 2016. Her Ph.D project ‘The Reception and Translation of Foreign Cultures in British Romantic Periodicals’ is supervised by Professor Tom Toremans (KU Leuven Campus Brussels) and Professor Tom Mole (University of Edinburgh). Responding to the relative neglect of the study of translation in Romantic (periodical) scholarship, her project analyses how the Edinburgh Review, the Quarterly Review, and the Westminster Review engage with other cultures and literatures. Through a critical comparative analysis of transfer and translation, the project investigates how the periodicals’ editorial practices reflect their ideological positions in the British literary marketplace.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: melanie.hacke@kuleuven.be

Ellen Lambrechts

Ellen Lambrechts

Ellen Lambrechts has obtained a Master’s degree in Spanish and French literature and linguistics at the University of Leuven, and studied Hispanic philology at the University of Seville. In October 2016 she started a PhD project under the supervision of Prof. dr. Erwin Snauwaert (supervisor) and Prof. dr. Nadia Lie (co-supervisor): ‘the translation and reception of the contemporary Peruvian fantastic narrative into French, Anglo-American, and Brazilian literary systems’. In particular, the project analyses how the manipulations of narrative enunciation that are characteristic of the so-called “fantástico de lenguaje” are reproduced in the different target languages, focusing not only on the translational shifts, but also on its aesthetical and ideological consequences in a transnational context.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: ellen.lambrechts@kuleuven.be

Ellen Mingazova

Ella

Ella Mingazova works on slowness in the contemporary novel. More particularly, how pace and slowness are experienced as effects during the reading of a fictional narrative. She has obtained her Master’s degree from UCLouvain in 2014 and has worked at Passa Porta in Brussels before starting her PhD at ULiège and at KU Leuven in 2017. Her broader interests include the relation between literature and nation-states and duration and ephemerality in the current cultural context of acceleration.

Affiliation: ULiège/KU Leuven
Contact: ella.mingazova@kuleuven.be
Publications

Myrthel Van Etterbeeck

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Myrthel Van Etterbeeck completed her master Cultural Studies at the University of Leuven. Presently she is working on a Ph.D under the supervision of Elke Brems and Reine Meylaerts. As part of the Belspo Brain project “Recognition and resentment: experiences and memories of the Great War in Belgium”, the research focuses on the on the experience and memory of World War I through the lens of Belgian literature. It strives to analyse the relationships between the presentation of the war and Belgian identity through a comparative analysis of a corpus that consists of both French and Dutch literary works.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: myrthel.vanetterbeeck@kuleuven.be

 

Members

Henri Bloemen

Henri Bloemen

Henri Bloemen is associate professor at the Faculty of Arts at KU Leuven, where he teaches Literary Translation (German to Dutch), Legal Translation and Translation Studies. He does reserach on Translation Theory, Ethics of Translation and Didactics of Literary Translation. He was co-initiator of the PETRA-E project on the education and training of literary translators and of the PETRA-E-network of which he is a board member. He is co-editor of the TS Series Approaches to Translation Studies (Brill/Rodopi).

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: henri.bloemen@kuleuven.be
Publications

Pieter Boulogne

Pieter Boulogne

Pieter Boulogne (1982), PhD in Slavonic Studies, is an assistant professor of Russian literature at KU Leuven and a visiting professor of Slavonic Studies at Ghent University. Since 2017, he is a board member of the KU Leuven Centre for Translation Studies (CETRA). His main research interests lie at the crossroads of history of Russian literature, descriptive translation studies and imagology. In 2011, he published a slightly overweight dissertation in Dutch on the early Dutch critical reception and (mostly indirect) translations of Dostoevsky, under the title Het temmen van de Scyth. De vroege Nederlandse receptie van F.M. Dostoevskij (Taming the Scythian. The Early Dutch Reception of F.M. Dostoevsky). More recently, he contributed to CODL: an international network studying the circulation of Dutch literature. Once in a blue moon, he indulges in literary translation from Russian and literary criticism.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: pieter.boulogne@kuleuven.be
Publications
Personal Website

Núria Codina

Nuria CODINA

Núria Codina is a postdoctoral fellow at KU Leuven and is currently working on a project on multilingualism, translation and minor languages in world literature. She received her PhD in Comparative Literature from Universität Tübingen. Her dissertation (Verflochtene Welten. Transkulturalität in den Werken von Najat El Hachmi, Pius Alibek, Emine Sevgi Özdamar und Feridun Zaimoglu, 2018) focuses on literature of migration in the German and Catalan context. She also holds a BA in German Philology from Universitat de Barcelona and a MA in Literary and Cultural Theory from Universität Tübingen. She has taught numerous courses on varied topics at Universitat de Barcelona and at the Institute of European Studies at Chemnitz University of Technology and has worked as an editorial fellow at Words Without Borders, the international magazine for contemporary literature in translation. Her research interests include literary multilingualism, transnational literature, postcolonial studies, translation theory and cultural studies.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact
: nuria.codina@kuleuven.be
Publications

Ben De Bruyn

Ben De Bruyn
Ben De Bruyn is a postdoctoral researcher of the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) and a senior researcher of the KULeuven-based MDRN group. He has taught literary theory and comparative literature at the universities of Leuven, Ghent, Liège, Nijmegen and Groningen. His first book offers a detailed analysis of the German and English writings of the world-renowned reception theorist Wolfgang Iser (De Gruyter, 2012) and he has written several articles on contemporary theory (ecocriticism, posthumanism) and on the representation of reading and books in modern and contemporary literature.
Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: ben.debruyn@arts.kuleuven.be

Christophe Declercq

voor CERES

Christophe is a lecturer at KU Leuven (Brussels campus) and senior lecturer at University College London. His main research interests and activities at present have two traits. The first research theme concerns the use of language and translation technology. The use of technology is seen as a way of making information more accessible. The second research theme concerns a much more culture-related orientation, focusing on transnational history and the impact of (temporary) exile on national identity, in particular Belgian refugees in Britain 1914-1919. Together with Julian Walker Christophe manages the Languages and the First World War project. Christophe has (had) multiple involvements with the European Commission and televised media (BBC and VRT).

Affiliation: KU Leuven, University College London
Contact: christophe.declercq@kuleuven.be
Twitter: @chrisdec71 @belgianrefugees @languagesFWW
Publications

Brecht de Groote

Brecht De Groote

Brecht de Groote recently completed his Ph.D in literary studies at the University of Leuven, Belgium. His dissertation, A Frightful Co-Existence: Thomas De Quincey, Translation, and the Prospect of Modernity, focuses on De Quincey’s attempts to rethink and redefine Romanticism so as to prepare literature, and through literature the nation at large, for the encroaching crises of modernity. Its central thesis is that this project takes its inspiration from translation: De Quincey figures British Romanticism as a middle ground between modernity and premodernity, as well as between German and French Romanticism, whose respective influences are to be reconciled through a practice and a theory of translation.

Brecht’s postdoctoral research project, When Political Economy was Popular: The Reception of Political Economy in Britain, takes its cue from De Quincey’s considerable but oft-neglected output of essays on political economy. In situating these essays in the context of a widespread movement for a literary reception of political economy, which grows especially prevalent in Britain in the period between 1817 and 1847, the project hopes to shed light on the exchanges between economics and literature during a period during which both these disciplines asserted their discursive specificities. Brecht is conducting part of his research at the University of Edinburgh, at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities as a Susan Manning Postdoctoral Fellow, in co-operation with the Centre for the History of the Book, both. During his time at Edinburgh, Brecht will be conducting research on the Edinburgh Review and Blackwood’s Magazine, both of which made significant contributions to the interaction between literature and economics.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: brecht.degroote@kuleuven.be

Ben De Witte

Ben De Witte

Ben De Witte is Doctor-Assistant at KU Leuven, where he teaches courses on European and Comparative Literature, and Translation Studies. His research interests include comparative drama, queer modernism, performance and adaptation, and translation studies. His dissertation “Queer Visibility on the Transatlantic Modernist stage” (Rutgers University 2016) argues that the staging of queer visibility in selected dramas by Argentinean playwright José González Castillo, Spanish poet Federico García Lorca, and US writers Tennessee Williams and Djuna Barnes is intelligible only within a constellation of transatlantic influences. Ben has published research and reviews in Modern Drama, Theatre Research International, and Theatre Journal.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: ben.dewitte@kuleuven.be
Publications

Tamara Gosta

Tamara Gosta
Tamara Gosta’s research has a double focus. In her doctoral dissertation (Persistent Pasts: Historical Palimpsests in Nineteenth-Century British Prose, Georgia State University, 2010), she explored the interplay between narrative, ethics and history in Romantic and Victorian writers such as Scott, Hogg, Carlyle and Eliot. She has published in this field in journals such as European Romantic Review (2011) and Studies in the Literary Imagination (2013). Beyond the nineteenth century, Gosta continues to interrogate the ethical implications of historical representation and translation. In this context, she has published on the Serbian Jewish writer David Albahari in World Literature Today (2013) and Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction. Gosta has been a research fellow at CERES since 2014.
Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact:

Reine Meylaerts

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Reine Meylaerts is Professor of Comparative Literature and Translation Studies at KU Leuven where she teaches courses on European Literature, Comparative Literature and Translation and Plurilingualism in Literature. She was director of CETRA (Centre for Translation Studies) from 2006-2014 and is now board member. Her current research interests concern translation policy, intercultural mediation and transfer in multilingual cultures, past and present. She is the author of numerous articles and chapters on these topics. She is also review editor of Target. International Journal of Translation Studies. She was coordinator of 2011-2014: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN: TIME: Translation Research Training: An integrated and intersectoral model for Europe. She is former Secretary General (2004-2007) of the European Society for Translation Studies (EST) and Chair of the Doctoral Studies Committee of EST.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: reine.meylaerts@kuleuven.be
Publications

Francis Mus

Francis Mus

Francis Mus (1983) is a postdoctoral researcher in Translation Studies at the University of Antwerp, where he teaches translation from French. Until October 2019, he was assistant professor at the University of Liège and research assistant at the University of Leuven. His research interests focus on the way(s) in which literature functions and circulates within and between multilingual and multicultural spaces, and on the role of translation within this circulation and reception process.

During the last decade, he has been working on two complementary research projects. He wrote a PhD dissertation on the internationalisation of the Belgian avant-garde in a corpus of literary magazines, written in French and in Dutch. By means of a discourse analysis, he demonstrated how the notion of internationalism, which was transposed from a political to a literary system, influenced the visibility and the (alternative) definitions of translation. A second project deals with the international circulation of music and literature. Initially, his main focus was the work of the Canadian poet and singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, both in his homeland and on an international scale. Mus’ essay De demonen van Leonard Cohen (Lannoo, 2015) was awarded the Literary Prize of the Province of East Flanders. In 2018, he has broadened his scope by studying the literary production of several popular musicians. This research project was funded by the University of Liège.

Francis Mus has contributed to a variety of leading journals in the fields of Translation Studies and Literary Studies, including TTR, JoSTrans, Orbis Litterarum and Cadernos de Tradução. An updated, scholarly version of his monograph on Cohen will be brought out in 2020 by Ottawa University Press.

Affiliation: KU Leuven, Université de Liège
Contact: francis.mus@kuleuven.be
Publications

Erwin Snauwaert

Erwin Snauwaert
Erwin Snauwaert is Professor at the Brussels campus of the KU Leuven where he teaches Spanish language, Hispanic Literature and Culture and Translation of Literary Texts and Essays. He proceeded to his doctor’s degree with a thesis about the Peruvian author Alfredo Bryce Echenique, which has been published as Crónica de una escritura inocente (1998). He is a member of the Research Unit ‘Translation and Intercultural Transfer’ and the ‘Centre for Reception Studies’ (CERES). He is mainly interested in the Spanish and Latin American contemporary novel, in fantastic literature and in intercultural and translation issues, a focus that comes forward in his recent articles and several contributions at international conferences.
Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: erwin.snauwaert@kuleuven.be

Beatrijs Vanacker

Bea profiel III

Beatrijs Vanacker is an FWO postdoctoral fellow at KU Leuven, where she teaches courses on French and comparative literature and literary translation. Her research interests include early modern prose fiction (focus on 18th century), mostly from a transcultural perspective, pseudotranslation and network analysis of (women) writers’ correspondences. She has been a visiting fellow at LMU München, Augsburg University and McGill University and has published on literary translation, (transcultural) poetics of the novel and women writers’ networks. She is a member of the executive board of the Dutch-Belgian Society for Eighteenth Century Studies and assistant editor of the online journal Interférences littéraires / Literaire interferenties.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: beatrijs.vanacker@kuleuven.be
Publications

Jan Van Coillie

Jan Van Coillie
Jan Van Coillie (1957) is professor at the Faculty of Linguistics and Literature of the KU Leuven, where he teaches applied linguistics and children’s literature (in translation). From 1999 till 2006 he was acting chairman of the Belgian National Centre for Children’s Literature. He has published widely on children’s poetry, fairy-tales, history of children’s literature, children’s literature in translation and children’s literature generally. From 1999 till 2004 he was editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedie van de jeugdliteratuur (Encyclopaedia of Youth Literature). Since 2006 he’s co-editor of the Lexicon van de jeugdliteratuur (Lexicon of Youth Literature) He is also active as a critic, author of children’s poetry and translator of picture books.
Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: jan.vancoillie@kuleuven.be

Colette Van Coolput-Storms

Colette Storms
Affiliation: KU Leuven / UC Louvain
Contact: colette.storms@kuleuven.be

Stefan van den Bossche

Stefan van den Bossche
Stefan van den Bossche is a Visiting Professor (bijzonder gastprofessor) at KU Leuven Campus Brussels and UC Leuven-Limburg. He graduated in Literature (KU Leuven) and Cultural sciences (VUB), and obtained a postgraduate degree in Art Gallery Studies. He obtained his doctoral degree at VU Amsterdam with a dissertation on life and works of Jan van Nijlen (2005). His research interests include reception studies, comparative literature and the interaction between literature and fine arts of fin de siècle and interbellum.
Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: stefan.vandenbossche@kuleuven.be

Walter Verschueren

Walter Verschueren

Walter Verschueren teaches translation and translation studies at KU Leuven. His research interests are translation and reception studies, particularly in the context of the nineteenth-century literary transfer between the UK and the Low Countries.

Affiliation: KU Leuven
Contact: walter.verschueren@kuleuven.be

 

Visiting Scholars

Sandra Llopart (Autumn 2019)

Sandra

Sandra Llopart studied English Philology at the University of Barcelona, and obtained a Master’s degree in Translation Studies at the Pompeu Fabra University. In 2017, she started the PhD project “Translation and Reception of African American Women’s Literature in Spain” under the supervision of Dr. Luis Pegenaute (Pompeu Fabra University). The project investigates the factors that have led to the translation and dissemination of the works of African American female authors in Spain, and analyzes the translation of Black English in the Spanish versions of Beloved (1993) and The Color Purple (1982). Sandra has joined the CERES team as a visiting scholar for a three-month research stay until December 2019.

Affiliation: Pompeu Fabra University
Contact: sandra.llopart@upf.edu
Publications

Oscar Jansson (Spring 2019)

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Oscar Jansson obtained a dual BA, in English and Scandinavian Literature, from Lund University and Linnaeus University in 2010, and an MA in Comparative Literature from Lund University in 2012. He is also an alumni of the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University. Oscar is currently a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Lund University, with a project on the international reception of Graham Greene. His research mainly concerns how Greene’s writing reflects the relationship between two central developments in Western 20th century literature: the rise of Modernism to cultural dominance, and the increasingly transnational and intermedial structure of the Western literary sphere.

In the Spring of 2019, Oscar is a visiting scholar at CERES, with a grant from the Royal Academy of Arts and Letters. He has published on Swedish national romanticism, satire in animated TV shows, and ideological critique in contemporary American novels. He is a member of the KompLitt research group at the Centre for Languages and Literature at Lund University, and is also project leader and co-editor of a project called The Geschlecht Complex: Essays on Gender, Genre and Ontology, with colleagues from Columbia, NYU and Penn State.

Affiliation: Lund University
Contact: oscar.jansson@litt.lu.se

Yaohong Yin

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Yaohong Yin obtained a Master’s degree in English-Chinese Translation at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies and is now a PhD candidate at Tongji University. As an international scholar at CERES, she works on the reception of Oscar Wilde’s aestheticism in China. The project aims to trace the course of transmission of Oscar Wilde’s works in China and lay special emphasis on how Chinese people received his aestheticism in the past 100 plus years.

Affiliation: Tongij University
Contact: yaohong.yin@student.kuleuven.be